Past Events

NEW ENGLAND’S GREAT RIVER & ITS WATERSHED FORESTS

Date: Thu May 12, 2016
Time: 4:30 PM
Place: Old Lyme Town Hall, 52 Lyme Street, Old Lyme, CT
Contact Email: mleslie@ctaudubon.org
Presenter: Dr. Robert Askins, Katharine Blunt professor of biology at Connecticut College
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

BanningwoodClick here for information about the lecture.

The lecture is free but seating is limited.
Please RSVP (acceptances only) to Madeline Leslie, mleslie@ctaudubon.org or call 203 259-0416 x404.

The Lyme Land Conservation Trust has just launched a fund raising effort to purchase 82 additional acres of forestland on the headwaters of Whalebone Creek, a key tributary feeding Whalebone Cove, one of the freshwater tidal wetlands that makes up the internationally celebrated Connecticut River Estuary system.

The proposed new woodlands wildlife refuge is to be named The Hawthorne Preserve and will protect key links for wildlife corridors that permit migration and breeding between otherwise isolated communities and families of many terrestrial species. 

For a guided walk on the Lyme Land Trust’s proposed new Hawthorne Preserve, contact Humphrey Tyler at: hstyler45@yahoo.com or 518-253-4844

 

BanningwoodClick here for information about the lecture.

The lecture is free but seating is limited.
Please RSVP (acceptances only) to Madeline Leslie, mleslie@ctaudubon.org or call 203 259-0416 x404.

The Lyme Land Conservation Trust has just launched a fund raising effort to purchase 82 additional acres of forestland on the headwaters of Whalebone Creek, a key tributary feeding Whalebone Cove, one of the freshwater tidal wetlands that makes up the internationally celebrated Connecticut River Estuary system.

The proposed new woodlands wildlife refuge is to be named The Hawthorne Preserve and will protect key links for wildlife corridors that permit migration and breeding between otherwise isolated communities and families of many terrestrial species. 

For a guided walk on the Lyme Land Trust’s proposed new Hawthorne Preserve, contact Humphrey Tyler at: hstyler45@yahoo.com or 518-253-4844

 


BanningwoodClick here for information about the lecture.

The lecture is free but seating is limited.
Please RSVP (acceptances only) to Madeline Leslie, mleslie@ctaudubon.org or call 203 259-0416 x404.

The Lyme Land Conservation Trust has just launched a fund raising effort to purchase 82 additional acres of forestland on the headwaters of Whalebone Creek, a key tributary feeding Whalebone Cove, one of the freshwater tidal wetlands that makes up the internationally celebrated Connecticut River Estuary system.

The proposed new woodlands wildlife refuge is to be named The Hawthorne Preserve and will protect key links for wildlife corridors that permit migration and breeding between otherwise isolated communities and families of many terrestrial species. 

For a guided walk on the Lyme Land Trust’s proposed new Hawthorne Preserve, contact Humphrey Tyler at: hstyler45@yahoo.com or 518-253-4844

 

BanningwoodClick here for information about the lecture.

The lecture is free but seating is limited.
Please RSVP (acceptances only) to Madeline Leslie, mleslie@ctaudubon.org or call 203 259-0416 x404.

The Lyme Land Conservation Trust has just launched a fund raising effort to purchase 82 additional acres of forestland on the headwaters of Whalebone Creek, a key tributary feeding Whalebone Cove, one of the freshwater tidal wetlands that makes up the internationally celebrated Connecticut River Estuary system.

The proposed new woodlands wildlife refuge is to be named The Hawthorne Preserve and will protect key links for wildlife corridors that permit migration and breeding between otherwise isolated communities and families of many terrestrial species. 

For a guided walk on the Lyme Land Trust’s proposed new Hawthorne Preserve, contact Humphrey Tyler at: hstyler45@yahoo.com or 518-253-4844

 


Trailblazers – Mt Archer Ruins

Date: Tue May 10, 2016
Time: 9:30 am
Place: Meet at Mt Archer Preserve Parking Lot, Mt Archer Road, Lyme
Contact Email: openspace@townlyme.org
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

Mt Archer RuinsBandA2Join us for this moderately easy walk in the woods. This April a group of volunteers cleared Japanese barberry, other invasives and debris from the ruins on the White Trail. We will visit the newly cleared site. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore the White and Yellow Trail in Mt Archer Woods, led by Wendolyn Hill, Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator and  Lyme Land Trust board member. The hike is a little more than 2 miles – about an hour long. Meet at the Mt Archer Woods Parking Lot.

Rain cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Mt Archer RuinsBandA2Join us for this moderately easy walk in the woods. This April a group of volunteers cleared Japanese barberry, other invasives and debris from the ruins on the White Trail. We will visit the newly cleared site. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore the White and Yellow Trail in Mt Archer Woods, led by Wendolyn Hill, Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator and  Lyme Land Trust board member. The hike is a little more than 2 miles – about an hour long. Meet at the Mt Archer Woods Parking Lot.

Rain cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).


Mt Archer RuinsBandA2Join us for this moderately easy walk in the woods. This April a group of volunteers cleared Japanese barberry, other invasives and debris from the ruins on the White Trail. We will visit the newly cleared site. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore the White and Yellow Trail in Mt Archer Woods, led by Wendolyn Hill, Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator and  Lyme Land Trust board member. The hike is a little more than 2 miles – about an hour long. Meet at the Mt Archer Woods Parking Lot.

Rain cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Mt Archer RuinsBandA2Join us for this moderately easy walk in the woods. This April a group of volunteers cleared Japanese barberry, other invasives and debris from the ruins on the White Trail. We will visit the newly cleared site. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore the White and Yellow Trail in Mt Archer Woods, led by Wendolyn Hill, Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator and  Lyme Land Trust board member. The hike is a little more than 2 miles – about an hour long. Meet at the Mt Archer Woods Parking Lot.

Rain cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).


Boundary Walk with Parker Lord-Lyme Corner Trails

Date: Sat April 30, 2016
Time: 9:00 -11:59ish am
Place: Meet at Hartman Park Parking Lot
Contact Email: openspace@townlyme.org
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

Stone wallPlease join us for this special walk. History enthusiast Parker Lord will lead us on a tour off-trail to see the ancient boundary markers between Lyme and East Lyme.

Meet at the Hartman Park Entrance Parking Lot at Lyme Corner Trails to carpool to the starting point on Beaver Brook Road. The walk will start off at Beaver Brook Road and end at the Hartman Park Entrance. It will be a little over 3 miles and will take about 3 hours. We will take a short break halfway through. Bring a snack and something to drink.

Meet at the Parking Lot of Hartman Park on Gungy Road in Lyme.

Rain cancels.

Directions: Hartman Park is on Gungy Road about 1 mile north of the 4-way stop signs at the intersection of Beaverbrook Road, Grassy Hill Road, and Gungy Road.

Registration Required: openspace@townlyme.org


Stone wallPlease join us for this special walk. History enthusiast Parker Lord will lead us on a tour off-trail to see the ancient boundary markers between Lyme and East Lyme.

Meet at the Hartman Park Entrance Parking Lot at Lyme Corner Trails to carpool to the starting point on Beaver Brook Road. The walk will start off at Beaver Brook Road and end at the Hartman Park Entrance. It will be a little over 3 miles and will take about 3 hours. We will take a short break halfway through. Bring a snack and something to drink.

Meet at the Parking Lot of Hartman Park on Gungy Road in Lyme.

Rain cancels.

Directions: Hartman Park is on Gungy Road about 1 mile north of the 4-way stop signs at the intersection of Beaverbrook Road, Grassy Hill Road, and Gungy Road.

Registration Required: openspace@townlyme.org


Lyme Spring Clean-Sweep

Date: Fri April 1, 2016 thru Sat April 23, 2016
Time: Daylight
Place: All Lyme Roadways
Contact Email:
Presenter: The Lyme Public Hall and the Town of Lyme
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

grassy_hill_painting06Clean up litter along the roadways in Lyme.

Free plastic bags are available at E.L. Reynold’s (Jane’s) Store, The Hadlyme Country Market, the Lyme Town Hall, and the Lyme Public Library.

Leave bags by the side of the road for town-wide pick-up.

grassy_hill_painting06Clean up litter along the roadways in Lyme.

Free plastic bags are available at E.L. Reynold’s (Jane’s) Store, The Hadlyme Country Market, the Lyme Town Hall, and the Lyme Public Library.

Leave bags by the side of the road for town-wide pick-up.


grassy_hill_painting06Clean up litter along the roadways in Lyme.

Free plastic bags are available at E.L. Reynold’s (Jane’s) Store, The Hadlyme Country Market, the Lyme Town Hall, and the Lyme Public Library.

Leave bags by the side of the road for town-wide pick-up.

grassy_hill_painting06Clean up litter along the roadways in Lyme.

Free plastic bags are available at E.L. Reynold’s (Jane’s) Store, The Hadlyme Country Market, the Lyme Town Hall, and the Lyme Public Library.

Leave bags by the side of the road for town-wide pick-up.


Trailblazers walk- Jewett and Pleasant Valley Preserve

Date: Fri April 22, 2016
Time: 9:30 am
Place: Meet at Pleasant Valley Parking Lot, MacIntosh Rd., Lyme
Contact Email: openspace@townlyme.org
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

OverlookJoin us for this moderate walk in the woods. We will be walking up an incline to get to the overlook at Pleasant Valley. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore Jewett and Pleasant Valley Preserve, led by Wendolyn Hill, Lyme Land Trust board member and Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator. The hike is a little more than 2.5 miles. This is the time of year to get a beautiful unobstructed view from the overlook at Pleasant Valley.

Rain or snow cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to left on Macintosh Rd. (across from Beaver Brook Road.) The parking area is about 1/4  mile on the right.

OverlookJoin us for this moderate walk in the woods. We will be walking up an incline to get to the overlook at Pleasant Valley. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore Jewett and Pleasant Valley Preserve, led by Wendolyn Hill, Lyme Land Trust board member and Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator. The hike is a little more than 2.5 miles. This is the time of year to get a beautiful unobstructed view from the overlook at Pleasant Valley.

Rain or snow cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to left on Macintosh Rd. (across from Beaver Brook Road.) The parking area is about 1/4  mile on the right.


OverlookJoin us for this moderate walk in the woods. We will be walking up an incline to get to the overlook at Pleasant Valley. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore Jewett and Pleasant Valley Preserve, led by Wendolyn Hill, Lyme Land Trust board member and Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator. The hike is a little more than 2.5 miles. This is the time of year to get a beautiful unobstructed view from the overlook at Pleasant Valley.

Rain or snow cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to left on Macintosh Rd. (across from Beaver Brook Road.) The parking area is about 1/4  mile on the right.

OverlookJoin us for this moderate walk in the woods. We will be walking up an incline to get to the overlook at Pleasant Valley. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore Jewett and Pleasant Valley Preserve, led by Wendolyn Hill, Lyme Land Trust board member and Town of Lyme Open Space Coordinator. The hike is a little more than 2.5 miles. This is the time of year to get a beautiful unobstructed view from the overlook at Pleasant Valley.

Rain or snow cancels.

Directions: Rt. 156 north to left on Macintosh Rd. (across from Beaver Brook Road.) The parking area is about 1/4  mile on the right.


Volunteer Work Party at Mt Archer Woods

Date: Sat April 16, 2016
Time: 9:00-11:00 am
Place: Mt Archer Woods Preserve
Contact Email: openspace@townlyme.org
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

Tools of the tradeMt Archer RuinsBandA2Please join us on Sunday, April 17 from 9:00 to 11:00 for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to continue clean-up of the historic ruins area. Bring heavy-duty work gloves to pull and remove barberry and pother invasives from the around the stone walls. Bring loppers and any other tools that you think will be helpful.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photos by Wendolyn Hill, work party on April 10, 2016

 

Tools of the tradeMt Archer RuinsBandA2Please join us on Sunday, April 17 from 9:00 to 11:00 for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to continue clean-up of the historic ruins area. Bring heavy-duty work gloves to pull and remove barberry and pother invasives from the around the stone walls. Bring loppers and any other tools that you think will be helpful.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photos by Wendolyn Hill, work party on April 10, 2016

 


Tools of the tradeMt Archer RuinsBandA2Please join us on Sunday, April 17 from 9:00 to 11:00 for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to continue clean-up of the historic ruins area. Bring heavy-duty work gloves to pull and remove barberry and pother invasives from the around the stone walls. Bring loppers and any other tools that you think will be helpful.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photos by Wendolyn Hill, work party on April 10, 2016

 

Tools of the tradeMt Archer RuinsBandA2Please join us on Sunday, April 17 from 9:00 to 11:00 for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to continue clean-up of the historic ruins area. Bring heavy-duty work gloves to pull and remove barberry and pother invasives from the around the stone walls. Bring loppers and any other tools that you think will be helpful.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photos by Wendolyn Hill, work party on April 10, 2016

 


Our Annual Meeting: Water Babies by William Burt

Date: Fri April 15, 2016
Time: 6:00 pm
Place: Lyme Public Hall, 249 Hamburg Road (Rte 156) Hamburg, CT
Contact Email: info@lymelandtrust.org
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

Water Babies–COVER ©Wm BurtJoin us for our annual meeting and see a wonderful slide show of photos based on William Burts’ new book Water Babies: The Hidden Life of Baby Wetland Birds.

A limited amount of books will be available for purchase at the event to be signed by the author.

The ‘babies’ are the downy young of ducks, grebes, gallinules and shorebirds, herons, and the other birds of wetlands – those that get their feet wet, as it were – and challenging they are, to birder and photographer alike: quick-footed, wary, and well-camouflaged, to say the least; and temporary (you have only a week or two each year in which to find them). But above all else, they are endearing. From the comic-monster herons to the fuzzy ducklings and stick-legged sandpipers, these tots have personality, and spunk. You see it in their faces, every one.”

Everyone is welcome. The evening will begin with casual social time and then a brief  business meeting. Members will be asked to vote for new director nominees. The presentation will follow.

William Burt is a naturalist, writer, and photographer with a passion for wild places and elusive birds – especially marshes, and the shy birds within. His feature stories are seen in Smithsonian, Audubon, National Wildlife, and other magazines, and he is the author of 3 previous books. Burt’s photo exhibitions have showed at some 35 museums across the U.S. and Canada. He lives in Old Lyme, Connecticut.

William Burt has been a judge for the Land Trusts Annual Amateur Photo Contest for ten years.

black-crowned night herons (yng) Stutsman CO ND 2013_MG_8917 ©WmBurtPhoto: Baby Night Crown Herons by William Burt (copyrighted image)

Water Babies–COVER ©Wm BurtJoin us for our annual meeting and see a wonderful slide show of photos based on William Burts’ new book Water Babies: The Hidden Life of Baby Wetland Birds.

A limited amount of books will be available for purchase at the event to be signed by the author.

The ‘babies’ are the downy young of ducks, grebes, gallinules and shorebirds, herons, and the other birds of wetlands – those that get their feet wet, as it were – and challenging they are, to birder and photographer alike: quick-footed, wary, and well-camouflaged, to say the least; and temporary (you have only a week or two each year in which to find them). But above all else, they are endearing. From the comic-monster herons to the fuzzy ducklings and stick-legged sandpipers, these tots have personality, and spunk. You see it in their faces, every one.”

Everyone is welcome. The evening will begin with casual social time and then a brief  business meeting. Members will be asked to vote for new director nominees. The presentation will follow.

William Burt is a naturalist, writer, and photographer with a passion for wild places and elusive birds – especially marshes, and the shy birds within. His feature stories are seen in Smithsonian, Audubon, National Wildlife, and other magazines, and he is the author of 3 previous books. Burt’s photo exhibitions have showed at some 35 museums across the U.S. and Canada. He lives in Old Lyme, Connecticut.

William Burt has been a judge for the Land Trusts Annual Amateur Photo Contest for ten years.

black-crowned night herons (yng) Stutsman CO ND 2013_MG_8917 ©WmBurtPhoto: Baby Night Crown Herons by William Burt (copyrighted image)


Water Babies–COVER ©Wm BurtJoin us for our annual meeting and see a wonderful slide show of photos based on William Burts’ new book Water Babies: The Hidden Life of Baby Wetland Birds.

A limited amount of books will be available for purchase at the event to be signed by the author.

The ‘babies’ are the downy young of ducks, grebes, gallinules and shorebirds, herons, and the other birds of wetlands – those that get their feet wet, as it were – and challenging they are, to birder and photographer alike: quick-footed, wary, and well-camouflaged, to say the least; and temporary (you have only a week or two each year in which to find them). But above all else, they are endearing. From the comic-monster herons to the fuzzy ducklings and stick-legged sandpipers, these tots have personality, and spunk. You see it in their faces, every one.”

Everyone is welcome. The evening will begin with casual social time and then a brief  business meeting. Members will be asked to vote for new director nominees. The presentation will follow.

William Burt is a naturalist, writer, and photographer with a passion for wild places and elusive birds – especially marshes, and the shy birds within. His feature stories are seen in Smithsonian, Audubon, National Wildlife, and other magazines, and he is the author of 3 previous books. Burt’s photo exhibitions have showed at some 35 museums across the U.S. and Canada. He lives in Old Lyme, Connecticut.

William Burt has been a judge for the Land Trusts Annual Amateur Photo Contest for ten years.

black-crowned night herons (yng) Stutsman CO ND 2013_MG_8917 ©WmBurtPhoto: Baby Night Crown Herons by William Burt (copyrighted image)

Water Babies–COVER ©Wm BurtJoin us for our annual meeting and see a wonderful slide show of photos based on William Burts’ new book Water Babies: The Hidden Life of Baby Wetland Birds.

A limited amount of books will be available for purchase at the event to be signed by the author.

The ‘babies’ are the downy young of ducks, grebes, gallinules and shorebirds, herons, and the other birds of wetlands – those that get their feet wet, as it were – and challenging they are, to birder and photographer alike: quick-footed, wary, and well-camouflaged, to say the least; and temporary (you have only a week or two each year in which to find them). But above all else, they are endearing. From the comic-monster herons to the fuzzy ducklings and stick-legged sandpipers, these tots have personality, and spunk. You see it in their faces, every one.”

Everyone is welcome. The evening will begin with casual social time and then a brief  business meeting. Members will be asked to vote for new director nominees. The presentation will follow.

William Burt is a naturalist, writer, and photographer with a passion for wild places and elusive birds – especially marshes, and the shy birds within. His feature stories are seen in Smithsonian, Audubon, National Wildlife, and other magazines, and he is the author of 3 previous books. Burt’s photo exhibitions have showed at some 35 museums across the U.S. and Canada. He lives in Old Lyme, Connecticut.

William Burt has been a judge for the Land Trusts Annual Amateur Photo Contest for ten years.

black-crowned night herons (yng) Stutsman CO ND 2013_MG_8917 ©WmBurtPhoto: Baby Night Crown Herons by William Burt (copyrighted image)


Volunteer Work Party at Mt Archer Woods

Date: Sun April 10, 2016
Time: 9:00-11:59 am
Place: Mt Archer Woods Preserve
Contact Email: openspace@townlyme.org
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

Tools of the tradePlease join us on Sunday, April 10 from 9:00 to 11:59-ish for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to clean up the historic ruins area, which has been overrun by invasive barberry and covered by fallen trees and branches. There will be plenty to do!! (So don’t worry that the work will be done before you get there).

We will remove barberry, fallen trees, brush, and debris. Be sure to bring heavy-duty work gloves (barberry has thorns!). We will need loppers to cut thinner branches and saplings, and many people to carry branches and brush away from the site. Parker Lord has already done mowing of barberry in the open areas. If you have a wheelbarrow that can be easily pushed on a trail, bring that. We will meet at the parking lot and then decide which tools to carry in.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. Join us for all or part of the time.

There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photo by Wendolyn Hill

 

Tools of the tradePlease join us on Sunday, April 10 from 9:00 to 11:59-ish for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to clean up the historic ruins area, which has been overrun by invasive barberry and covered by fallen trees and branches. There will be plenty to do!! (So don’t worry that the work will be done before you get there).

We will remove barberry, fallen trees, brush, and debris. Be sure to bring heavy-duty work gloves (barberry has thorns!). We will need loppers to cut thinner branches and saplings, and many people to carry branches and brush away from the site. Parker Lord has already done mowing of barberry in the open areas. If you have a wheelbarrow that can be easily pushed on a trail, bring that. We will meet at the parking lot and then decide which tools to carry in.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. Join us for all or part of the time.

There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photo by Wendolyn Hill

 


Tools of the tradePlease join us on Sunday, April 10 from 9:00 to 11:59-ish for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to clean up the historic ruins area, which has been overrun by invasive barberry and covered by fallen trees and branches. There will be plenty to do!! (So don’t worry that the work will be done before you get there).

We will remove barberry, fallen trees, brush, and debris. Be sure to bring heavy-duty work gloves (barberry has thorns!). We will need loppers to cut thinner branches and saplings, and many people to carry branches and brush away from the site. Parker Lord has already done mowing of barberry in the open areas. If you have a wheelbarrow that can be easily pushed on a trail, bring that. We will meet at the parking lot and then decide which tools to carry in.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. Join us for all or part of the time.

There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photo by Wendolyn Hill

 

Tools of the tradePlease join us on Sunday, April 10 from 9:00 to 11:59-ish for a work party at Mt. Archer Woods Preserve in Lyme to clean up the historic ruins area, which has been overrun by invasive barberry and covered by fallen trees and branches. There will be plenty to do!! (So don’t worry that the work will be done before you get there).

We will remove barberry, fallen trees, brush, and debris. Be sure to bring heavy-duty work gloves (barberry has thorns!). We will need loppers to cut thinner branches and saplings, and many people to carry branches and brush away from the site. Parker Lord has already done mowing of barberry in the open areas. If you have a wheelbarrow that can be easily pushed on a trail, bring that. We will meet at the parking lot and then decide which tools to carry in.

The ruins are a little more than a half-mile in on the white trail. Join us for all or part of the time.

There will be refreshments!

Meet at the Main Parking Lot of Mt Archer Woods on Mt Archer Road in Lyme.
Directions from Rte 156:
Rt. 156 north to Mt. Archer Road. Left onto Mt Archer Road. Go one mile on Mt Archer Road (bear left up the big hill). The parking lot is down a long driveway on the left, the 4th long driveway after you start up the hill. Look for the stone post marker that has “Mt Archer Woods Town of Lyme” written on it. It faces the road, so you can’t read it until you are on top of it. (If you get to 100 Mt. Archer Road, you have gone too far).

Please let me know if you are planning to be there. openspace@townlyme.org

Photo by Wendolyn Hill

 


Trailblazers – Walk at the Young Preserve

Date: Fri April 8, 2016
Time: 9:30 am
Place: Philip E. Young Preserve, Gungy Road, Lyme
Contact Email: openspace@townlyme.org
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

Young hikeJoin us for this moderately easy (a few hills) walk in the woods. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore the YOUNG PRESERVE, led by Wendolyn Hill, Lyme Land Trust board member and Open Space Coordinator for the Town of Lyme. The hike is about 2 miles long. We will meet at the entrance to the Young Preserve on Gungy Road. Park by the sign.

Rain Cancels.

Directions: Rte 156 N to right on Beaver Brook Road; about 1 mile to left on Gungy Road at 4-way stop; about 0.5 mile to park entrance on the right.

photo by Wendolyn Hill, Young Preserve hike 2015


Young hikeJoin us for this moderately easy (a few hills) walk in the woods. Everyone is welcome.

This week’s hike will explore the YOUNG PRESERVE, led by Wendolyn Hill, Lyme Land Trust board member and Open Space Coordinator for the Town of Lyme. The hike is about 2 miles long. We will meet at the entrance to the Young Preserve on Gungy Road. Park by the sign.

Rain Cancels.

Directions: Rte 156 N to right on Beaver Brook Road; about 1 mile to left on Gungy Road at 4-way stop; about 0.5 mile to park entrance on the right.

photo by Wendolyn Hill, Young Preserve hike 2015


Coyotes – Friend or Foe?

Date: Sun March 20, 2016
Time: 2 PM
Place: Lyme Public Hall 248 Hamburg Road Lyme, CT
Contact Email: info@lymelandtrust.org
Presenter: Frank Vincente
!!! seems it only displays well the 2nd time? ugh.

wilddog-05_02_19-6Since coyotes first extended their range into Connecticut in the 1950s, they have become an established presence in rural and urban areas. Is this intelligent animal unjustly demonized? Coyotes play an important role in the ecosystem in helping to control the overpopulation of deer and rodents. Frank Vincenti, of the Wild Dog Foundation, will present a talk about the natural history and habits of this fascinating animal, and address common misconceptions. He will discuss common sense ways to co-exist with coyotes and explain reasons to appreciate wildlife, such as the coyote, that can readily adapt to environments that are inhabited by people.

The program includes beautiful images and factual engaging conversation which will interest adults and children. There is no admission fee.

The Lyme Public Hall is in the Hamburg Center of Lyme on Rte 156, 5 miles north of I-95.

Photo from Wild Dog Foundation webpage.

terkkers

wilddog-05_02_19-6Since coyotes first extended their range into Connecticut in the 1950s, they have become an established presence in rural and urban areas. Is this intelligent animal unjustly demonized? Coyotes play an important role in the ecosystem in helping to control the overpopulation of deer and rodents. Frank Vincenti, of the Wild Dog Foundation, will present a talk about the natural history and habits of this fascinating animal, and address common misconceptions. He will discuss common sense ways to co-exist with coyotes and explain reasons to appreciate wildlife, such as the coyote, that can readily adapt to environments that are inhabited by people.

The program includes beautiful images and factual engaging conversation which will interest adults and children. There is no admission fee.

The Lyme Public Hall is in the Hamburg Center of Lyme on Rte 156, 5 miles north of I-95.

Photo from Wild Dog Foundation webpage.

terkkers


wilddog-05_02_19-6Since coyotes first extended their range into Connecticut in the 1950s, they have become an established presence in rural and urban areas. Is this intelligent animal unjustly demonized? Coyotes play an important role in the ecosystem in helping to control the overpopulation of deer and rodents. Frank Vincenti, of the Wild Dog Foundation, will present a talk about the natural history and habits of this fascinating animal, and address common misconceptions. He will discuss common sense ways to co-exist with coyotes and explain reasons to appreciate wildlife, such as the coyote, that can readily adapt to environments that are inhabited by people.

The program includes beautiful images and factual engaging conversation which will interest adults and children. There is no admission fee.

The Lyme Public Hall is in the Hamburg Center of Lyme on Rte 156, 5 miles north of I-95.

Photo from Wild Dog Foundation webpage.

terkkers

wilddog-05_02_19-6Since coyotes first extended their range into Connecticut in the 1950s, they have become an established presence in rural and urban areas. Is this intelligent animal unjustly demonized? Coyotes play an important role in the ecosystem in helping to control the overpopulation of deer and rodents. Frank Vincenti, of the Wild Dog Foundation, will present a talk about the natural history and habits of this fascinating animal, and address common misconceptions. He will discuss common sense ways to co-exist with coyotes and explain reasons to appreciate wildlife, such as the coyote, that can readily adapt to environments that are inhabited by people.

The program includes beautiful images and factual engaging conversation which will interest adults and children. There is no admission fee.

The Lyme Public Hall is in the Hamburg Center of Lyme on Rte 156, 5 miles north of I-95.

Photo from Wild Dog Foundation webpage.

terkkers